Tear gas and water cannons - arrests after new revolts 2

Tear gas and water cannons – arrests after new revolts

Hong Kong does not rest. Over the weekend, there were violent riots in the city again. For the first time, the protesters attacked the official Chinese news agency.

Protests in Hong Kong have led to clashes between police and protesters. Dozens of people were arrested. The police used tear gas, rubber bullets, pepper spray and a water cannon.

Radical activists threw incendiary bombs, built roadblocks and attacked companies with suspected relations with China. For the first time, the protesters also targeted the Xinhua Chinese news agency building and hit the windows in the entrance area.

The headquarters of the Xinhua Chinese news agency in Hong Kong: the protesters also destroyed the shops where they suspected relations with China. (Source: Reuters / Tyrone Siu)The headquarters of the Xinhua Chinese news agency in Hong Kong: the protesters also destroyed the shops where they suspected relations with China. (Source: Tyrone Siu / Reuters)

Spontaneous appearances of the campaign

It was the 22nd consecutive weekend that events took place in the Chinese special administrative region. The protests are directed against the government and the growing influence of the communist leadership in Beijing.

After the police had not previously approved a rally initially scheduled in Victoria Park, candidates for district council elections gathered there spontaneously for campaign appearances, which need not be specifically approved, as long as the groups remain small. However, the police dissolved tear gas encounters.

Beijing announces a harder pace

Subsequent clashes in the neighborhood streets also ended two approved demonstrations in Chater Garden and Edinburgh Place. The riots lasted until evening. Hong Kong's central subway station was closed and arrested after protesters set fire to an entrance, according to the South China Morning Post.

The atmosphere in Hong Kong was overheated after the leader of this week's democratic movement, Joshua Wong, was disqualified as a candidate for district council elections. He was accused of propagating independence with a request for self-determination in Hong Kong. The communist leadership of Beijing also announced that it will adopt a tougher position in Hong Kong.

The protesters call for free elections, an independent investigation into police brutality and impunity for those already more than 2,000 arrested. The former British colony of the crown was governed autonomously by its return to China in 1997 on the principle of "one country, two systems". Unlike the people of the Communist People's Republic, Hong Kong's seven million enjoy freedom of expression and assembly, but increasingly fear for their freedom.