Article by WN.Com Correspondent Dallas Darling

Adolf Hitler's well-known statement "If you say a big enough lie and if you say it often enough, we'll believe it" is only half the truth. The other half is when you say a pretty big lie and as you often say, you can believe the same lie repeated. It involves parts of the truth that we use either conveniently for our benefit or that we replace with silence – silence being a lie as well.

Therefore, that is why we deny Donald Trump and our democracy, or why we do not want to admit the interference of Russia in our last election.

It was an election that not only showed how gullible the Americans were, but it made us even more opposed to each other and allowed us to vote for the wrong candidates.

Truth or deadly consequences

Although lying is an evolutionary trait that drives us toward self-preservation when we feel threatened, our desire to protect ourselves and our basic needs that may seem in danger has an effect on others. While dishonesty can help those we try to protect, such as altruistic white and gray lies, others can hurt. These black and red lies used to deceive others by responding to our own selfish needs or to harm and destroy have consequences. Consequences that can be deadly as in the case of Hitler. Of course, when a liar and a nation become too adept at dishonesty and deceit, they may lose the ability to discern the truth. The truth that is necessary for our very existence.

Repeating lies does not make them true

It has become terribly clear that Trump has lied about his many commercial relations and the Trump Foundation, his campaign promises and his conspiracy agreements with Russian agents to steal the 2016 general election. even for his campaign associates, most of whom pleaded guilty to a number of federal crimes.

Hillary Clinton is also not innocent of similar black and red lies, having known and helped to rig the Democratic primaries. In fact, it seems that dishonesty has become the favorite hobby of the United States, especially considering the scandals surrounding Barack Obama, George W. Bush and his father, George HW Bush, Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan and many others. It affects our democracy so deeply.

The most useful tool of the liar

One of the reasons people are dishonest is loyalty. Conventional wisdom tells us that the key to success in most organizations is loyalty. It is not only vital for the entire organization to function, but it is often what the leaders of the organization ask for. This includes the subconscious foundations of loyalty as an emotional concept with strong unconscious components. Loyalty based on an objective, a position, an ideology, a promise or even a need to earn money is therefore dominated by fidelity to the truth. He may also be guided by a relational oath, such as the oaths of loyalty requested by Trump to his entourage, White House staff, and his followers.

Many truths that disturb

Another reason why we do not like the truth is that it means admitting we were wrong. In fact, we hate to be wrong – which is another evolutionary trait that protects our ego. We also arrive at our wrong assessments and beliefs in a given context, involving a tribe with a certain set of emotions and shared values. That's why it's so difficult for Trump and Clinton supporters to admit that their candidates were lying – and lying. The same goes for a democracy that has ceased to be a democracy – if it had been true. The same lies are then passed on to others so that they can live and repress. Certainly, people can not bear too much reality. Nor can they deal with the pain and cognitive dissonance created by the truth.

Irreplaceable syndromes for all tastes

A classic case of dishonesty and delusion is what Trump told an influential person close to him. As indicated by Infowars, he thinks that the Americans will revolt if the Deep State tries to remove him from office by indictment or by any other means, because the Americans are "too well armed". He also thinks the Democrats are so intent on stopping his program that they will do a destabilizing crisis at the border, an economic collapse or even a civil war as a way to get him out of the oval office. Just in case you laugh, he is like many others who embellish their own importance and believe that they are irreplaceable. Make imaginary conspiracies simply to convince them of this illusion.

Lies induced by techno

Lack of attention, attention deficit and repeated distractions can also lead to lying. Although it is normal to have memory problems, psychologists say that our technological age, with its many distractions and technical interference, has decreased our concentration and attention span. Given the number of interruptions and our over-stimulation, memory problems have become more common than many realize. The distortion of facts and events over time, the absence of reason and the bad attribution – remembering only a part of the facts and events while filling the rest of the conjectures – has increased. And then, there is the power of bias and suggestibility, which deceive our memory and deceive our emotional brain.

Saying lies makes the thing we fear become stronger

The defense mechanism of sublimation is another way people are dishonest. Cultural or collective amnesia, it is a repressive defense against catastrophic memories that turns any troubling memories into something less harmful and more acceptable. From the atrocities committed in Vietnam and Latin America to the denials of the Amerindian genocide, to decades of slavery and the persistence of racism, there is simply too much truth and guilt. In fact, we may have normalized the creation of new positive stories. If this is the case, so is the Russian interference. I met many Trump supporters who saw no problem with neither Russia nor Russia cheating on our last election.

Only the enemies tell the truth

This leads us to the moral component of lying and dishonesty, or the absence of it. For some Americans, it's a victory that gives them meaning. Win even if it means telling black and red lies. This type of "reasoned reasoning" is another thing people use to reach the conclusions they want to see. Winning by all means is also a psychological catalyst that encourages everyone to see literally what they want – despite the facts. Known as "What does this bring to my group?", Trump supporters still carry the 2016 election – and the Wall of Borders – as its own. 39, acted as a social badge of membership, a badge of honor and initiation and a disagreement that leaves room for insincere arguments. .

Tell a lie, it's inventing 20 more

The discovery of Trump's letter of intent regarding several hotels, condominiums and the Trump Tower in Russia – which he and his lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, have repeatedly denied know, is not surprising. By directly linking him and his presidential campaign to the Russian ambassador and perhaps to President Vladimir Putin, it is obvious that there is a compromise: Russia will help Trump to become president in exchange for a more favorable foreign policy and a reduction of sanctions. Trump and Putin hope to make millions. Recall also that Putin had an intense disgust for Clinton. Rest assured, he rejoiced at his defeat.

The disappointment of Christopher Steele

But again, Clinton and his followers are not so innocent. The former British spy, who is behind the notorious alleged collusion between Trump and the Kremlin, said one of his goals was to give Clinton a legal basis to challenge the results of the 2016 election. Commissioned by Clinton Campaign's Fusion GPS, the 17-page succinct report by Christopher Steele was mainly published to harm Trump and his character, including his business relationship and the Trust Factor ". The main allegations in the document have never been corroborated. . Some people think that they are probably false, full of lies.

A demagogy of lies

The reason why no extremist demagogue won the presidency before 2016 is not the absence of contenders for such a role, but because there are enough people who have recognized half-truths. This may no longer be the reality – or the truth and what it really is. That's what made – and still does – the dishonesty of Trump and Clinton, including ours, so dangerous. It has mixed with our democratic experiences and our elections, making our democracy and our democratic institutions a big lie. In addition, we did not lie, but we can not believe ourselves or trust us anymore. It's the real crime. Without truth and a sense of trust, our country will not be able to survive very long.

Dallas Darling (darling@wn.com)

(Dallas Darling is the author of Politics 501: an AZ reading of conscientious political thought and action, nations above God: 52 weekly reflections on imperialism, militarism and modern consumerism in the context of John's apocalyptic vision and on the other side of Christianity: reflections on faith, politics, spirituality, history and peace. www.WN.com. You can read more writings from Dallas to www.beverlydarling.com and www.WN.com/dallasdarling.)