Surveillance tools used against Covid-19 will outlive him

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Getting rid of these emergency devices after the epidemic looks difficult."data-reactid =" 23 ">Getting rid of these emergency devices after the epidemic looks difficult.

Milo Hsieh, a Taiwan-based journalist, had the bad idea of ​​forgetting to charge his cell phone during his forties. At 7:30 a.m., the cellphone turned off. Fifty minutes later, the police knocked on his door.

On the island, the authorities geolocate quarantined people using their mobile phones, to ensure that they do not leave their homes. Any anomaly triggers an alert.

My phone, which is satellite-tracked by the Taiwan gov to enforce quarantine, ran out of battery at 7:30 AM. By 8:15, four different units called me. By 8:20, the police were knocking at my door.

In Singapore, to enforce quarantine, the authorities send several text messages per day to residents asking them to share their GPS coordinates.

In addition, the entire population was invited to download an application called TraceTogether. This has access to all of the phone's contacts and activates Bluetooth.

The application records contacts between people. If someone gets the coronavirus, all of its interactions will be known. This makes it possible to make "contact tracing" – to trace all the contacts of a person infected during the last fifteen days – much more easily and surely. Information on infected people is also available on the internet (!).

In South Korea, intrusive technologies are also used to monitor the progression of the disease in the population and enforce quarantines.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "In the West too"data-reactid =" 31 ">In the West too

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Tolerance to surveillance seems more important in Asian democracies – with the possible exception of Hong Kong – than in European countries. Certain technological solutions which are implemented there would be more difficult to accept in the EU. (…) Read more on Slate.fr

"data-reactid =" 32 "> Tolerance to surveillance seems more important in Asian democracies – with the possible exception of Hong Kong – than in European countries. Certain technological solutions implemented there would be more difficult to accept in the EU, however (…) Read more on Slate.fr