December 6, 1917: the German submarine U-53 sinks the USS Jacob Jones (DD 61)

December 6, 1917: the German submarine U-53 sinks the USS Jacob Jones (DD 61)

  • Published: Dec. 20 2012
  • Views: 1224

On December 6, 1917, during the First World War, the German submarine U-53 was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Jacob Jones (DD-61) off the coast of England, causing 64 casualties. There were 38 survivors, with two men captured by the enemy submarine. The commander of the U-53, Hans Rose, in a rare gesture of war, reported the drifting location of the remaining men at the US base in Queenstown, Ireland. Note that on the night of December 6 to 7, the British camellia and the British liner Catalina conducted rescue operations. At 8:30 the next morning, HMS Insolent gathered the last survivors of Jacob Jones.

Audio: SecNav Josephus Daniels "No rank in the sacrifice "

"The history of the acts of heroism accomplished by the navy members in this war will shine with a light that will never be on the sea or on earth." Men who live valiantly and die nobly have the strength and the courage of the eternal Father.Two of these young heroes recently received a great honor, one of the Annapolis graduates, the other one of A man of rank, there is no rank in the sacrifice Many years ago, when the first destroyers were built, they received the names of John Paul Jones and Perry and Farragut and Decatur. Not all illustrious names are born to die, custom is maintained, and two of the last destroyers have been named Cork and Ingram.
The torpedoing of the Jacob Jones gave us more than one hero of the navy, some of them being spared for future achievements. He was defeated until the end, was the story of the spirit of Lieutenant F. S. Cork. At the beginning of the evening, in a weakened state, this brave young officer swam in the cold waters, d …

December 6, 1917: the German submarine U-53 sinks the USS Jacob Jones (DD 61)

  • Published: Dec. 20 2012
  • Views: 1224

On December 6, 1917, during the First World War, the German submarine U-53 was torpedoed and sunk by the USS Jacob Jones (DD-61) off the coast of England, causing 64 casualties. There were 38 survivors, with two men captured by the enemy submarine. The commander of the U-53, Hans Rose, in a rare gesture of war, reported the drifting location of the remaining men at the US base in Queenstown, Ireland. Note that on the night of December 6 to 7, the British camellia and the British liner Catalina conducted rescue operations. At 8:30 the next morning, HMS Insolent gathered the last survivors of Jacob Jones.

Audio: SecNav Josephus Daniels "No rank in the sacrifice "

"The history of the acts of heroism accomplished by the navy members in this war will shine with a light that will never be on the sea or on earth." Men who live valiantly and die nobly have the strength and the courage of the eternal Father.Two of these young heroes recently received a great honor, one of the Annapolis graduates, the other one of A man of rank, there is no rank in the sacrifice Many years ago, when the first destroyers were built, they received the names of John Paul Jones and Perry and Farragut and Decatur. Not all illustrious names are born to die, custom is maintained, and two of the last destroyers have been named Cork and Ingram.
The torpedoing of the Jacob Jones gave us more than one hero of the navy, some of them being spared for future achievements. He was defeated until the end, was the story of the spirit of Lieutenant F. S. Cork. At the beginning of the evening, in a weakened state, this brave young officer swam in the cold waters, d …